7 Fun Experiments to Try at the Chemistry Lab

7 Fun Experiments to Try at the Chemistry Lab

Most people are fairly divided on science: either you love it, or you hate it. If you belong to the latter camp, it is probably because science classes may seem too technical and boring. However, that is a great misperception. If you know what to do, scientific experiments can be fun—even magical! With the right scientific equipment and know-how, you can take up a number of interesting projects. In the chemistry lab, you can make gooey slime, invisible ink, and glittering crystals! Here are 7 simple and fun experiments to try out at the chemistry lab! 1. Layered Drink You must have seen beautiful drinks with distinctly separate layers and colors. Gravity-defying and magical as these drinks may look, they are actually based on simple scientific manipulation. This type of drink is based on the principles of density: the denser a liquid, the more it will sink. Effectively, you can layer one type of drink on another. All you need is: two-four...
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Alloy

Alloy

Dear Readers: Today we will discuss about the alloy.  In our day to day life alloy has got immense importance.  The ratio of composition is very important while studying the alloy. Alloy can be considered as a solid solution. Eg. Brass (Zinc and Copper)   Duralumin - Al:Cu:Mg:Mn = 95:4:0.5:0.5 Used for making bodies of aircraft and pressure cooker   Magnalium – Al:Mg = 90:10 Used for making bodies of aircraft   Stainless steel – Fe:Cr:Ni:C = 73:18:8:1 Used for making utensils and cutlery   Manganese steel – Fe:C:Mn = 85:1:14 Used for making Armour plates and Rock drill machine   Nickel steel – Fe:Ni = 95:5 Used for making Automobile parts and Electric wire cable   Invar – Fe:Ni:C = 63:36:1 Used for making scientific instruments and metre scale   Brass – Cu:Zn = 70:30 Used for making decorative utensils, screws, cartridge, and parts of watch   Bronze – Cu:Sn:Zn = 80:18:2 Used for making medals, statues, utensils   German silver – Cu:Zn:Ni = 50:30:Ni Used for making electric heater, rheostat and decorative articles   Solder or Fuse metal - Pb:Sn...
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Functional Groups of Organic Compound

Functional Groups of Organic Compound

Hi viewers In this blog we will discuss about the various types of Functional Groups of Organic Compound.   FUNCTIONAL GROUPS A group of atoms responsible for the characteristic reactions of a particular compound   Functional groups   -OH             is an alcohol group -CHO          is an aldehyde group -CO-            is a ketone group -COOH       is a carboxyl or acid group -NH2               is an amino group -CONH2      is an amide group     Now let us check out the compounds when these functional groups get added with the methyl group   CH3-OH                =      Methyl alcohol   CH3-CHO              =      Acetaldehyde   CH3-CO- CH3        =       Acetone   CH3-COOH           =         Acetic acid   CH3-NH2               =          Methylamine   CH3-CONH2       =         Acetamide     Berzelius in 1817 recognized that organic compounds are made up of compound radicals – the radicals being linked to one another in the compound.  The structural formula of a given compound readily reveals the radicals present.  Methyl alcohol CH3-OH may be split up into methyl group CH3-  and  hydroxyl radical   -OH Similarly, Acetic acid CH3-COOH can be split up into methyl group CH3-  and carboxyl radical–COOH     If you have enjoyed reading this post "Functional Groups...
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Homologous Series of Organic Chemistry

Homologous Series of Organic Chemistry

Hi viewers: In this blog we discuss the very basic idea about "Homologous Series of Organic Chemistry". HOMOLOGOUS SERIES Definition In organic chemistry a homologous series is a series of compounds with the same general formula The number of organic compounds is unbelievably large but majority of them have been classified into several series of similar structure or constitutions and chemical properties.  Thus the hydrocarbons methane, ethane propane etc. form a series and is collectively known as paraffin sir alkane.  The alkane may be given the general formula CnH2n+2   The molecular formula of each member of the series  differs from that of another which precedes or follow it by one atom of carbon and two atoms of hydrogen ie. By CH2     Paraffins CnH2n+2   Methane  CH4 Ethane  C2H6 Propane  C3H8 Butane   C4H10 Pentane    C5H12 Hexane    C6H14   Alcohols CnH2n+2.OH   Methyl alcohol   CH3OH Ethyl alcohol      C2H5OH Propyl alcohol    C3H7OH Butyl alcohol      C4H9 OH   FUNCTIONAL GROUP A group of atoms responsible for the characteristic reactions of a particular compound   If you have enjoyed reading this post "Homologous Series of Organic Chemistry".  I would be very...
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An Introduction to Organic Chemistry

An Introduction to Organic Chemistry

Hi viewers: In this blog we discuss the very basis fundamental knowledges about An Introduction to Organic Chemistry. Organic chemistry is also known as carbon chemistry So Organic compound is also known as carbon compound   All carbon compounds are not organic compound like CO2 and CO   German scientist Wholer was able to produce organic compound from inorganic compound.  He first formed Urea CO(NH2)2 from ammonium cyanate NH4CNO.  He is regarded as father of Organic Chemistry   Catenation property Carbon can form a long chain by linking with each other.  It is a unique property of carbon   Properties of Organic Compound It must contain carbon atom They are covalent They have low boiling and melting point They are non-electrolyte Homologous series can be formed Isomers are formed   C2H6O  -----à  1.   C2H5OH (ethyl alcohol)     2.    CH3-O-CH3  (dimethyl ether)   Soluble in organic solvent   Classification of organic compound   It is broadly categorized into 1.  Open Chain Compound and 2.  Closed Chain Compound   Open Chain further classified into 1.  Saturated compound  eg. All paraffins or alkanes Unsaturated compound eg....
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Mendeleeff’s Periodic Table

Mendeleeff’s Periodic Table

Hi viewers: In this blog we discuss about the Mendeleeff’s Periodic Table Periodic Classification of Elements Many attempts were made to classify elements for study of their study. Elements were divided on the basis of their states solid, liquid and gas and then by on the basis of Metals and non-metals but faced the failure due to the complex nature of the elements Mendeleeff at last gave the shape of the periodic classification of the elements.  He was able to find out the relation between the properties of the element with their atomic weight. Nature of the Mendeleeff’s Periodic Table When the elements are placed according to the increase of their atomic weight, it is found that elements in the same group possess the same properties. In this fashion when elements are placed they are placed in the horizontal rows and vertical column. The vertical column is known as group and The horizontal rows are known as period Mendeleeff’s Periodic Table there are 9 groups including 0 group, which is started from   I,...
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Electrovalency and Covalency

Electrovalency and Covalency

Hi viewers: Here we will discuss about the very basic ideas about Electrovalency and Covalency. Electrovalency The valency of the elements which enable them to combine with one another through direct transfer of electrons and to form ions in order to get  the electronic configuration of inert gases and are held together by electrostatic force of attraction is known as electrovalency or ionic valency   Electrovalent compound It is formed by transfer of electron It is an electrolyte It ionizes in aqueous solution or molten state Melting points and boiling points are very high If it dissolves, it dissolves in water     Covalency The valency of the elements which enable them to combine with one another through mutual sharing of electron pairs in order to attain the electronic structure of inert gases, to form a molecule is known as covalent bond   Covalent compound It is formed by mutual sharing of electrons It is non-electrolyte It does not ionizes in aqueous solution Melting points and boiling points are very low ...
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